Write What Readers Want

iStock_000019666774XSmall

I learned to write at Gotham’s Writers’ Workshop. If you’re unfamiliar with their program, you should check it out. They have something for everyone. Most of their classes last for ten weeks and offer a weekly lecture, plenty of group discussion, and the opportunity to have your work critiqued, either by your classmates or your teacher depending on which course you have selected. Some of the classes I completed:

  1. Creative Writing 101
  2. Fiction Writing
  3. Novel Writing—several times
  4. Master Novel Class
  5. Query Writing
  6. Blogging

From the looks of this list, I was a bit of a Gotham junkie there for a while. Although I highly recommend Gotham, the best training I ever received in novel-writing, however, was from James Scott Bell. Or his book rather, Plot and Structurewhich is part of the series, Write Great Fiction.

In the early stages of Saving Ben, when I was developing my characters and working out the plot lines, I worked through every exercise in this guide. Bell’s ideas helped me develop a whole new approach to Plot and Structure.

Winner

With 663 words in 15 minutes, Suemcg is the winner of Wednesday’s writing challenge. Congratulations! Sue, please e-mail me your mailing address at ashleyatchronicles@gmail.com.

Discussion

What sorts of things do you consider when trying to please your reader?

Today's Contest

plot-0026-structure-cover

To win a copy of Plot and Structure, you must first complete the following exercise from the first chapter. If you are growing tired of these activities, bear with me. I promise, you don’t want to miss this one.

To quote from the book:

“Set aside ten minutes of undisturbed writing time. For those ten minutes, write a free-form response to the following: When readers read my novels, I want them to feel _______________ at the end. That’s because, to me, novels are ______________. Write from the gut, quickly.”  

To be entered in the Random.org drawing, complete this exercise and provide your feedback in the comments. This contest will be opened through midnight tomorrow night, Saturday, February 9. The winner will be announced on Sunday in Chronicles’s Week in Review.

#writeclub

Tune in to Twitter tonight from 8pm-2am EST

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Write What Readers Want

  1. When readers read my novels, I want them to feel challenged at the beginning, excited during the read and completely and utterly satisfied and affected at the end. That’s because, to me, novels are trips to different worlds, meeting new friends and doing things I’ve never done before.

  2. When readers read my novels, I want them to feel like they’ve had a shot of pure adrenaline and that they’re sad to leave the characters alone in that world at the end. That’s because, to me, novels are about experiencing the things and falling in love with people the reader would never dare to in real life.

  3. When readers read my novels, I want them to feel moved at the end. That’s because, to me, novels are canvasses on which we convey emotions. From Nancy Drew to Anne Rice, I am usually moved by everything that I read. I want to feel those emotions you are trying to convey.

  4. When readers read my novels, I want them to feel terrified that someone or something is watching them at the end. That’s because, to me, novels are a way to bring fantasy and fictional events to real life. Horror novels, like the ones I write, should make the reader question their own surroundings.

  5. Pingback: QUOTES « just a quote

  6. Pingback: How to Write a Novel (Free Download) « Writing Tips

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s